100 Years from Now

Pemon Rumi, a Chicago based producer was being interviewed by an instructor at Purdue, he was saying your film will be around longer than you. It’s something I never really thought about. After I’m dead and gone, people will be able to see what I’ve done and judge it without knowing anything else about me. But it goes beyond that, my art can affect people’s perspectives and may change minds on how they see the world.

Being an African-American filmmaker, sometimes I feel like I’m not to free to express myself. The short film I’m currently working on is a crime drama based in Chicago. I want to make the film as entertaining as possible but I worry about how people will interpret the film. Media is a powerful thing but how do I balance my self-expression with the outside world. Do I hold back what I want to say in order to make sure I don’t upset people that are “woke”?

Nina Simone talks about being free is to have no fear, I take that to mean free to express what you feel without worrying about what society thinks. I feel to be a true artist I have to be free to express the ideas and stories I have inside of me. I can’t control the reception and that’s fine. If people hate what I create I’d rather them hate something I put my heart into rather than some half-ass shit that I self-censored in order to please people. So 100 years from now some may hate it, some will love it and the rest won’t give a shit. Whatever people think of my work they know I was being honest to myself. 

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